University of Maryland Study

Engineering & Physical

USM researchers are engineering solutions to the challenges presented by COVID-19, as well as adapting existing processes and facilities to rapidly deploy equipment to the medical community. In addition, USM incubators and research parks are providing businesses with access to USM expertise and state-of-the-art facilities, allowing them to accelerate innovations and bring them into market.



A. James Clark School of Engineering

University of Maryland, College Park

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Several departments and institutes at the School of Engineering have collaborated to use 3D printing resources to produce face shields for health care workers. In the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, researchers have adapted polymer research to produce fiber surgical masks.
Researchers are using facial scanning and 3D printing technology to develop custom-fit, reusable N95 masks for health care workers.

Terrapinworks, James Clark School of Engineering

University of Maryland, College Park

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To decrease the possibility of virus transmission, engineers have used advanced manufacturing and digital design resources to generate 3D-printed door latches to enable individuals to open doors without use of their hands.
Researchers from the two universities are collaborating to determine if a gamma irradiation sterilization process can be used to prolong the lifetime of N95 respirators.

Techport

University of Maryland, College Park

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Researchers at Techport have partnered with local companies to develop a heat sanitation module that can be used to rapidly clean personal protective equipment using intense heat. Another team has developed a prototype of an emergency ventilator by altering the suction power in a breast pump to expel air.

bwtech@UMBC Research & Technology Park

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

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At the bwtech@UMBC research park, a UMBC-alumni owned microfabrication company, Potomac Photonics, repurposed their equipment and processes to produce several thousand face shields for hospital workers. They are also developing microfluidic chips that will be used for testing of COVID therapies.

UM Ventures

University of Maryland, Baltimore

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Breethe, the medical device company founded by University of Maryland School of Medicine surgeon and professor Dr. Bartley Griffith, has been acquired by Abiomed. UM Ventures was an early investor in Breethe, which developed a portable artificial lung system that can be used to treat patients suffering from respiratory failure as a result of infections caused by viruses such as COVID-19.
Researchers are collaborating with Johns Hopkins University and the Baltimore City Health Department to develop a low-cost, rapidly deployable mobile testing booth – similar to a traditional phone booth in both size and shape. The booth uses a HEPA filter blower to create a positive pressure system to prevent virus particles and other germs from entering the booth.
A team of researchers have developed a novel version of an intubation box, or an aerosol box. Their patent-pending device is designed to serve as an added protective barrier between a COVID-19 patient and medical staff, particularly when a patient undergoes an intubation procedure to be placed on a ventilator.

A. James Clark School of Engineering

University of Maryland, College Park

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Jeffery Klauda, an associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Bryan Berger, an associate professor of chemical engineering at the University of Virginia, have received a National Science Foundation grant to study two proteins (ORF7a and OR7b) said to be instrumental in how the COVID-19 virus interacts with human cells. The research will focus on how these proteins form larger protein complexes that affect the interactions between the virus and the infected cells.

Center for Sustainability in the Built Environment

University of Maryland, College Park

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Dr. Jelena Srebric, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the university’s Center for Sustainability in the Built Environment, collaborated with Dr. Shelly Miller of the University of Colorado Boulder to conduct a respiratory emissions analysis of subjects playing musical instruments (clarinet, flute, horn and trumpet) and a soprano singer to identify aerosol release pathways, measure particle size and concentration, and assess risk of COVID-19 transmission.

Center for Sustainability in the Built Environment

University of Maryland, College Park

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Using computational fluid dynamics, a University of Maryland research team has analyzed the concentration of airborne COVID-19 particles in two indoor cases with different air supply and exhaust configurations. The team will expand the research to examine airborne movement of the particles in various setting, including classrooms, school buses, airplane cabins, and outdoor settings.

Department of Chemistry

Salisbury University

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Guided by faculty-mentor Assistant Professor Joshua Sokoloski, chemistry major Brandon Tenaglia is analyzing the internal structure and three-dimensional shape of the novel coronavirus RNA, to support future research into direct RNA-interacting therapies.
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USM Experts and Institutions

CONNECT & COLLABORATE

USM experts seek opportunities to collaborate on solutions to the COVID-19 crisis. Now more than ever, partnership is critical.
To make a connection, use the contact form or email covidsolutions@usmd.edu.

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